“It’s the only grill I use to make paella, which is tricky because you need to start out really hot and then move to a cooler area,” says Katie Button, chef and owner of Cúrate and Nightbell in Asheville, NC. “You can do that by timing your charcoal, but that’s a lot more finicky. All you do with the Kudu is move the pan up. It’s so simple.”

Most grills you buy—think the classic Weber—have round bottoms, so eventually, as the charcoal cooks, it all falls to the center of the basin. The Kudu has a flat bottom, so you have more hot surface area to work with. “And its legs come off easily and none of its parts are so heavy that you can’t carry it to your car and pop it in the trunk,” Button adds. “Obviously, you can’t do that with your Big Green Egg!”

Read the full article from Bon Appetit>>


Due to exceptionally high volume and increasing demand for the KUDU, we are currently very low on inventory and on pace to sell out within the next day or two. Our expected in-stock date is tentatively set for mid June.

Ready for your KUDU and want to avoid the wait? Visit your local KUDU Authorized Dealer, or buy from one of our authorized online sellers who have grills in stock and ready to ship: Northline Express


Moose on Fire recently shared a KUDU grill review with a delicious Roadside Chicken recipe:

“The KUDU delivered the results I was hoping for in a big way, and I’m looking forward to many more delicious meals courtesy of this versatile cooker.

Overall, the KUDU is an extremely versatile grill/cooker that can perform many functions equally well, from direct cooking over high heat, indirect cooking, searing, and even smoking smaller pieces of meat using the smoker lid, which I highly recommend.

There is something very intimate and primal about cooking food over a wood-fueled fire, and with the perfect height of the KUDU, it’s way more convenient and easier on one’s back than cooking over an in-ground fire pit.

Finally, the KUDU is easily transportable – remove the two rods that hold the cooking grates, put the KUDU upside down, remove the legs, and it’s ready to go wherever you want to take it. The KUDU would be an ideal grill for someone who is considering a Santa Maria style grill, but wants  a more compact size and more versatility, and anyone who appreciates the incomparable taste of wood cooked over a live fire.”

Read the full review from Moose on Fire >>


Do you know the story behind KUDU? The Renasant Crafted video series recently highlighted our story on their Rated Red channel and helped tell the world just exactly who we are and why every backyard in America needs a KUDU Open Fire System.

KUDU continues to be a game-changer in the revolution toward more primitive ways of cooking – and connecting with others around us – and we’re proud to have our story featured.

We are here to change how the world grills,
one flame at a time.



We’ve all fallen victim to the check-out line impulse buy, that thing we didn’t know we needed until it was staring us in the face: Mounds bar, Us Weekly, mini eyeglass repair kit. As I was leaving the Charleston Wine + Food Festival, I spied chef Kevin Gillespie of Gunshow slinging hash over sizzling coals. He was dishing up thick slices of pork roll, but what stopped me in my tracks was the sharpest-looking grill I’ve ever laid eyes on. Sleek legs, three levels of powder-coated steel, and open fire: Gillespie’s own KUDU Safari Braai. Fifteen minutes later (and $700 dollars lighter), I was loading one into my car.

I won’t lie—a hint of buyer’s remorse hit as I cruised back home along I-95. But then I fired up the grill. Look, I’m no pitmaster, but I’ve read Steven Raichlen’s Barbecue Bible, manned the spit at Lambstock, ladled pozole out of a Cowboy Cauldron, shadowed American Grilled’David Guas, and logged flight time on a pair of Big Green Eggs. But nothing has made me stop, drop and coal like the KUDU.

Read the full article in Esquire >>



“I’ve been really excited to [grill] desserts and bread this summer! I’ve got a new open flame cooker (the KUDU grill) and it has all these fun accessories like a Dutch oven and a bread maker, so I’ve officially been giving summer grilling an overhaul. I took a Dutch oven last weekend, set it straight into the coals, placed coals all around and on top of it and, literally, baked a peach cobbler while grilling pork chops, peaches, and onions above it. I’ve been working on a shortcake to bake on the grill, that would then be topped with all sorts of grilled summer stone fruits and berries and whipped sour cream.”

Read full article in Vogue >> 


Every time someone in this town closes the lid on a grill and sets a timer, a hair stands up on the back of Kevin Gillespie’s neck. “That’s just a really bad principle for cooking in general,” says the chef, who—along with Macon-based entrepreneur Stebin Horne—created a South African–style open grill called the Kudu. (Thanks, Kickstarter!) “So much of your success as a cook relies on instinct, and you’ve got to be able to see and touch your food to tell when it’s done,” says Gillespie.

While there’s no lid on the Kudu, there are two arms, one on either side of the fire pit, with tray attachments that can be swung back and forth and up and down over the heat. That’s the most basic and efficient way to control temperature, after all—distance from the fire.

Could the Kudu take the place of the (heavily lidded) Big Green Egg in the hearts and minds of our city’s best chefs? Only time will tell, but Bizarre Foods host Andrew Zimmerman is a fan.

Read full article in Atlanta Magazine >>